How to Getting Creative with Storage?

Use a door hanging shoe caddy for added storage. If the back of your bathroom door is still available, a door hanging shoe caddy can contribute plenty of storage space. These can be bought at most general retailers and hang simply from a door.

Fill the pockets of your hanging shoe caddy with toiletry bottles, bathing supplies, and so on.

Create a towel holder from a wine rack. The shape of many wall hanging wine racks is perfect for holding rolled towels. In addition to this looking classy, these are usually generally easy to install. In most cases, all you’ll need to do is screw the rack into the wall to create a wall holder for towels.

Before you screw in the wine rack to the wall, be sure to check that it’s level. To do this most efficiently, you may want to ask a friend to help. You should be able to find suitable wine racks at big box stores, general retailers, and hardware stores. Once the wine rack is mounted on the wall, roll up your towels and place them in the slots where the wine bottles would normally go.

Store spare toilet paper in oatmeal canisters. Toilet paper stacked precariously in your cabinets can be easily knocked over and can contribute to clutter. Large oatmeal canisters can store two to three rolls of toilet paper, depending on the kind of toilet paper, giving you a nifty spot to stash TP.

You can add some flair to your oatmeal canister by covering its outer surfaces with a wrapping paper that matches the decor of your bathroom. You don’t have to use oatmeal canisters — any kind of large, colorful kitchen canister will work.

 

How to Optimizing Your Bathroom’s Storage Space?

Utilize all available surfaces. The back of your bathroom door is a frequently underused space. But this is a great place where you can install extra towel racks. You could also purchase organizers with adhesive backing and stick these to the inside of the doors of your cabinets to boost your bathroom storage capacity. Though these kinds of organizers are frequently small, they still work great for things like lipstick, cotton swabs, lotions, eyebrow pencils, toothbrushes, and more. You can also attach some hooks to the back of your bathroom door for hanging towels or robes.

Put stackable shelves or drawers in your cabinets for more storage room. Stacking shelves or drawers will help you utilize more of the space in your cabinets (if they don’t already have shelves to begin with). Too often, items clutter the bottom of cabinets while the upper space is unused. Stackable shelves or drawers will help you make better use of this space.

Put a lazy susan in your cabinets. Items can be easily pushed to the back of a cabinet and lost or forgotten. For this reason, you may be under-utilizing the space in the back of your bathroom cabinets. A lazy susan is essentially a tray that rotates on a base, so you can spin the tray to reach items in the back of your cabinets more easily. You can also put a small lazy susan on your counter to save space.

Install tower shelving in your shower. These kinds of shelves often fit right into the corner of your shower, where they are out of the way but still convenient. They are perfect for holding soap bottles and loofahs, and will prevent bathing supplies from crowding the floor of your shower or edge of your tub. Some variations of tower shelving hang from the shower head itself instead of fitting into the shower‘s corner. This variety may be even better for especially small showers.

Upgrade your sink storage. There are many pre-made cabinets, available at hardware and furniture stores, that wrap around your sink to increase your storage space. If this option is a little outside your price range, you could buy a decorative curtain and install it around suitable sinks with storage space underneath (like pedestal sinks), and then store bathroom items there.

How to Using Spice Racks to Add Storage Space?

Determine if spice racks will work in your bathroom. If you have wall space above your toilet, to the side of your mirror, or in a similar location in your bathroom, extra spice rack storage will likely work for you. Use a tape measure to measure the available space so you know what size shelf your bathroom can accommodate. The narrow design of most spice racks along with their usually raised edges, intended to keep spices from falling, are perfect for holding toiletries and bottles. Spice racks are great for holding makeup and other cosmetics.

Purchase suitable spice racks. Your bathroom may only be able to fit a single spice rack, or it may fit a few shelves, but in both cases you’ll need to go purchase a spice rack. Pre-made racks are available at many big box retailers, furniture stores, and hardware stores. Be sure to check the dimensions of potential shelves against the measurements you took earlier of your available spice rack space.

Measure and mark your spice rack placement. Use a pencil and a tape measure to mark the placement of your shelf or shelves on your bathroom wall. Try not to hang the racks too high or low, as will make them less convenient. Generally, two marks measured to the same height, one for the right end of your spice rack and the other for the left, will be sufficient for hanging.

The distance between your marks should be the same as the distance separating the holes that will attach your rack to the wall. Don’t hang the spice racks too close to an electrical outlet or light switch. You don’t want to accidentally drill through some wiring in the wall.

Install the spice racks. Depending on your spice rack, your method of installment will vary. In many cases, you’ll have to attach some hardware to your wall with a drill. This hardware, usually some kind of simple holding bracket, will then support the shelf or shelves. In other cases, you may have to screw your shelf directly into the wall with a drill. Hanging the spice rack on your own, while possible, may be difficult. A helper would likely make installing your shelf or shelves easier.

Check the levelness of the spice racks. Once the spice racks have been installed, take a carpenter’s level and check that your shelf or shelves are level. If your shelf is uneven, this could cause your toiletries to slant toward one end of the rack or the other. If your spice rack isn’t level, remove it from its hardware or the wall, adjust it slightly, re-check its levelness, and if it is level, reinstall the shelf.

How to Replace a Bathroom Faucet Handle?

Sometimes the handle of a bathroom faucet is put on incorrectly so it doesn’t rest in the correct position when the faucet is off. Other times the faucet handle may crack, discolor or otherwise look old, while still functioning. In either of these cases, the faucet handle can be replaced with a new one, without replacing the rest of the faucet.

Turn off the water supply to the faucet. Look beneath the sink for a valve close to the wall on the same side as the handle you are replacing. If this is a single handle faucet, turn off both supplies. When you locate them, twist the water supply valve or valves tightly to the right.

Test the faucet to ensure no water comes out when the handle to be replaced is turned. Examine the cap or top of the handle. Typically faucet handles have a false top or cap. This may be a porcelain cap that reads “hot” or “cold,” or it may be a metal cap in the same finish as the rest of the handle. Use a flat head screwdriver to loosen the cap and pry it up.

Look at the area hidden beneath the cap for a screw. Use the appropriate screwdriver to loosen and remove this screw. Lift off the handle of the faucet from its stem. Look at the back of the escutcheon or decorative cover at the bottom of the handle. There should be a very small hole with an Allen key screw in the back. Use an Allen key to loosen and remove this screw.

Lift the escutcheon off of the counter. The interior valve of the faucet should now be visible. Place a new escutcheon over the valve. Line up the screw at the back and tighten it down so the escutcheon does not move. Place the handle over the top of the valve so it sits on the escutcheon. Twist it completely to the “on” position and back off to make sure it is positioned properly.

Insert a screw into the top of the handle and tighten it down. Place the cover or cap into the top of the handle. If the cap reads “hot”, “color” or another word, line this up to face you. Snap the cap down into the cap of the faucet. Turn on the water supply and test the handle.

 

How to Installing the New Seat?

Set the new seat in place. Remove it from the box. The hinges on the seat will be pre-attached. Place these exactly where the hinges on the old seat were located. The box will also contain bolts and nuts. It may also include plastic caps to go over the bolts. Set this hardware to the side.

Drop the bolts into place. Take a bolt in your hand. The hinges will have holes for the bolts to be inserted into. Since the toilet seat is in place exactly where the previous seat was, these holes will also be positioned directly on top of the holes in the top of the toilet bowl. Drop the bolts through the holes in the hinges and bowl, with the head of the bolt on top. Don’t worry. Since the bolts have a head, they won’t fall all the way through the holes.

Thread the nuts onto the bolts. Pick up one of the nuts. Look at one side of the toilet bowl. You should now see the end of one of the bolts sticking down through the top of the bowl. Turn the nut onto the bolt (clockwise) until it is as tight as you can get it by hand. Use your adjustable wrench to tighten the nut just a bit further.

Repeat with the other nut on the other side of the toilet. If your hardware includes washers as well, place these on the bolts threads, then put on the nut. If the hinges have plastic caps attached (or if these are included in the box with the new toilet seat), snap these in place by pushing them down on the heads of the bolts once you’re done.

Snap the seat into place, alternatively. For some models of toilet seats, you don’t drive the bolts through the hinges. Instead, you drop the bolts directly to the holes on either side of the toilet bowl, instead of driving them through the hinges first. Then fix them in place with nuts. The seat’s hinges will snap onto or slide over the bolt heads. Double-check the instructions that came with your toilet seat if you have this variety.

How to Removing the Old Seat Before  Install a New Toilet Seat?

Pop off the bolt caps, if necessary. Look at the edge of the old toilet seat, near the tank. You may see plastic caps where the seat’s hinges attach to the toilet bowl, one on each side. If so, gently slide the flathead screwdriver under their edge and pry them off. If there are no bolt caps, you will just see the bolts themselves attaching the hinges of the seat to the toilet bowl.

Loosen the nuts. Hold your adjustable wrench and look underneath the edge of sides of the toilet bowl. You should see bolts going down through the porcelain, held in place by nuts. There will be one on each side of the bowl. Attach the adjustable wrench to each nut. Turn the wrench counterclockwise to loosen the nuts.

Remove the old seat’s bolts. The bolts at the base of the hinges on top of the toilet bowl may be slotted for a screwdriver. If so, use yours and turn each bolt counterclockwise until it comes out. Otherwise, you can continue turning the nuts counterclockwise until they come off. If your old seat has washers between the nut and bowl, remove those as well.

Wrestle with the old bolts, if they’re stuck. On some older toilets, the bolts might be rusted or stuck in place by grime. If so, they may not come out easily. Don’t panic — you have some options! First, spray WD-40 on the threads of the rusted bolts. Let it sit for 10 minutes, then try again to remove the bolts.

If that doesn’t work, place your adjustable wrench on the nut. Hold it in place as you use the screwdriver in your other hand and attempt to turn the bolt out. If the bolts are still stuck, use your small hacksaw to saw them off. Place the blade just under the toilet bowl, at the top of the nut, and gently saw back and forth until you cut the bolt all the way off.

Dispose of the old seat and hardware. Lift the bolts out of the bowl, if you haven’t already. You should then be able to remove the toilet seat and its hinges easily. Toss out the old seat, bolts, and nuts.

 

How to Choosing a New Seat Before Install a New Toilet Seat?

Installing a new toilet seat is an easy DIY project. Whether you’re replacing yours because it’s old, or because you just want a new style, all you need are some basic tools and a few minutes. Unbolt the old seat, then pop the new one in place using the hardware included in your new toilet seat’s box. The only trouble you’re likely to run into is if the old bolts are stuck, but a little elbow grease can take care of that problem.

Measure your current toilet bowl before buying a new seat. Most toilets are standard sized, and any replacement seat should fit. If you want to be extra sure, take a tape measure to check the distance between the bolt holes in the toilet bowl. Then make sure the distance between the bolts on the replacement seat is the same.

Choose the style of seat you want. Toilet seats come in 2 basic styles, and a home supply store should have several brands to choose from. The standard variety is rounded, but you can choose an elongated one if you prefer. You can also purchase a “whisper close” seat that has special pads on the bottom to prevent it from slamming down on the bowl. Toilet seats come in a range of prices. You should be able to find the cheapest for $20-30, but others that cost twice as much or more.

Choose a seat color that matches your current toilet bowl. You can find toilet seats in a variety of colors. Choose one that matches the toilet bowl (usually white) for a classic look, or choose a contrasting color to make a bolder statement. For instance, you could choose a blue or wooden toilet seat to contrast with a white bowl.

Gather your tools for the project. You’ll need just a few simple ones to handle this project. If you don’t already have these at home, head down to the hardware store and get: An adjustable wrench or pliers. A flathead screwdriver. Spray oil such as WD-40 (optional). A small hacksaw (optional)

 

How to Cleaning Area Around Toilet?

Cleaning a toilet is a task that often gets postponed, but it’s essential to keep toilets clean. A dirty toilet will look bad, smell bad and breed germs. However, as with many of life’s less pleasant tasks, cleaning your toilet now can save you headaches later. With these instructions, you’ll get through this task quickly and efficiently.

Remove items from atop and around the toilet. Before you begin, clear the toilet of things that may obstruct you while cleaning – tissue boxes, photos, etc.. Because you want to give the toilet a thorough cleaning, you’ll need to be able to reach every nook and cranny. Clearing items away from the toilet won’t just allow you to clean under and around them – it will keep them out of the way, safe from harmful cleaners, and will prevent any accidental drops into the toilet.

Rinse or dust the items that were on or around the toilet. You don’t want to make your sparkling clean toilet impure by transferring dust onto it from an unclean picture frame or tissue box. Put on clean gloves, then give the items that were on or around the toilet a quick clean.

Wet and lightly scrub them if they’re waterproof, or, if they’re not, just give them a quick pass with a brush. Wipe the items clean with a paper towel and put them back in their places. When you’ve finished, take your gloves off and wash your hands as a precaution against the spread of bacteria.

Spray the floor around the toilet with the disinfectant spray. Often, if your toilet‘s dirty, the floor around it is too. You don’t want to get your feet dirty every time you use the toilet, so take the opportunity to clean the surrounding section of floor. Use a brush or broom to sweep up any loose hair or debris around, and especially behind, the body of the toilet. Wipe the area clean with wet paper towels, disposable wipes, or a cloth.

How to Quick Cleaning Your Toilet?

Clean the lids. Now that you’ve cleaned the bowl, it’s time to clean the main points of contact – the top and bottom lids. Use all-purpose cleaner and rags/paper towels (or disposable sanitary wipes) to give both the lids a quick but thorough cleaning on both sides. If you want to, use an old toothbrush to scrub the hard-to-reach spots between the lid and the body of the toilet as well as the hinges.

Give the body of the toilet a quick wipe-down. Finally, it’s time to give your toilet‘s porcelain a squeaky-clean shine. Using a spray bottle, mist the exterior of the toilet with an all-purpose cleaner. Use a rag or paper towel to wipe down the toilet‘s porcelain, paying special attention to the handle. Alternatively, you may simply dip a rag or paper towel in cleaning solution or warm water, re-dipping the rag or towel when it is soiled.

Start cleaning the highest point on the toilet first – this way, if dirty water or cleaning fluid drips down, it will only touch areas you haven’t cleaned yet. Don’t forget to clean hard-to-see areas like the base of the toilet and the back of the tank, which faces the wall. To successfully clean these areas, you may need to use pipe cleaners or a tooth-brush.

Flush! Your toilet should now be looking much better than it did before. Give your toilet a flush to dispose of any dirty water that’s accumulated in the bowl. If you used any toilet tissue while cleaning your toilet, this is also a good chance to get rid of it, provided you used an amount small enough that you’re sure your toilet won’t clog.

As a precaution, wash your hands after taking your gloves off. Small amounts of water may have splashed inside the gloves while cleaning. If your toilet only needed a quick, “light” clean, congratulations – you’re done! If, however, your toilet has serious stains or hasn’t been cleaned in a long time, you may have more success with the “deep cleaning” method below.

 

How to Quick Cleaning a Toilet?

Grab your tools. If you’re repulsed by the thought of cleaning a toilet, you’ll want to have everything you need ready to go beforehand so the process is as quick as possible. Grab rubber gloves, which are essential, plus as many of the following things as you can find: a toilet brush, sanitary wipes, an old, out-of-use toothbrush, clean rags (or paper towels), and/or toilet cleaner.

Here’s a sanitation tip – keep a pair of rubber gloves solely for the purpose of cleaning the toilet. Buy them in a distinct color that’s different from every other pair of gloves you own. This way, you won’t accidentally use them for washing dishes, etc.

You may also want to have some all-purpose cleaner handy. You can find this at the grocery store, but, if you want to save cash, you can also make your own cleaning solution by adding 1 tbsp dish soap to 6 oz of water.

Scrub the bowl. You can clean the different parts of the toilet in any order you like, but, if you’re in a hurry, you may find that it’s smartest to start with the bowl. This way, if you splash any dirty water out of the bowl while you’re cleaning it, it won’t get parts of the toilet that you’ve already cleaned dirty.

Use a toilet brush to scrub away any stains or mineral deposits you see. You may need to apply some pressure to eliminate caked-on stains. For added cleaning power, drop a little toilet cleaner or all-purpose cleaner into the water, then dip the brush in it.